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resource research Museum and Science Center Exhibits
The purpose of this paper is to explore results from a qualitative study of how high school aged BLV youth used spatial language during a virtual engineering experience administered by the National Federation of the Blind (NFB). Findings from this study can provide recommendations to enhance language in curricula that better reflects BLV students' content and may ultimately encourage more BLV students to pursue careers in STEM fields.
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TEAM MEMBERS: Gary Timko Natalie Shaheen Wade Goodridge Theresa Green Daniel Kane
resource research Museum and Science Center Exhibits
This paper explores data collected from BLV participants who completed a TMCT test at National Federation of the Blind (NFB) sponsored summer programs for BLV youth, blindness training centers, and state and national NFB conventions. Raw scores from each TMCT participant were analyzed and ranked into high, medium, and low performing groups to help identify main characteristics of each group.
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TEAM MEMBERS: Daniel Kane Natalie Shaheen Wade Goodridge
resource research Afterschool Programs
The purpose of this research paper is to explore advantages and disadvantages of conducting an engineering experience for blind and low vision (BLV) participants in a virtual/online environment. This experience was designed to expose BLV high school students to engineering content and enhance their spatial ability. Spatial ability is an intelligence generally defined as the ability to generate, retain, retrieve, and transform well-structured visual images and is particularly important to fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). A variety of spatial ability constructs have
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TEAM MEMBERS: Gary Timko Natalie Shaheen Wade Goodridge Theresa Green Daniel Kane
resource research Museum and Science Center Exhibits
The impetus behind this effort was to create a platform for initial support to TEE professionals who may have a blind and low-vision (BLV) student in their courses.  Specific examples, instructions, and applications for many of the commonly-used tools and techniques are included here as part of this overall effort to teach TEE concepts through socially relevant contexts by adapting older methods to facilitate new opportunities in our school systems for BLV youth. 
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TEAM MEMBERS: Scott Bartholomew Wade Goodridge Natalie Shaheen Anne Cunningham
resource research Conferences
This paper describes the development and preliminary validation of a new spatial ability instrument that is designed to be accessible non-visually. Although additional work is needed to finalize the test, preliminary analysis indicates that the test has high reliability and validity.
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TEAM MEMBERS: Sarah Lopez Wade Goodridge Isaac Gougler Daniel Kane Natalie Shaheen
resource research Conferences
This paper seeks to illustrate the first steps in a process of adapting an existing, valid, and reliable spatial ability instrument – the Mental Cutting Test (MCT) – to assess spatial ability among blind and low vision (BLV) populations. To adapt the instrument, the team is developing three-dimensional (3-D) models of existing MCT questions such that a BLV population may perceive the test tactilely with their hands.
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TEAM MEMBERS: Tyler Ashby Wade Goodridge BJ Call Sarah Lopez Natalie Shaheen
resource research Summer and Extended Camps
This paper discusses the development of the Tactile Mental Cutting Test (TMCT), a non-visually accessible spatial ability instrument, developed and used with a blind and low vision (BLV) population. Data was acquired from individuals participating in National Federation of the Blind (NFB) Conventions across the United States as well as NFB sponsored summer engineering programs. The paper reports on a National Science Foundation funded effort to garner initial research findings on the application of the TMCT. It reports on initial findings of the instrument’s validity and reliability, as well
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TEAM MEMBERS: Natalie Shaheen Ann Hunt Daniel Kane Wade Goodridge
resource research Museum and Science Center Programs
This guide was created by adapting the Sciencenter PD materials for broader dissemination. It is intended to provide some general information and tips on incorporating more youth voices in an ISL setting, as well as a framework for convening discussions with others at your institution around the topic.
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resource research Museum and Science Center Programs
Youth Lead the Way: A Youth Advisory Research Board Model for Climate Impact Education, hosted by the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI), offered a theory-based approach for youth from communities underrepresented in STEM to conduct content research on local climate change impacts and develop interactive educational products designed to engage public audiences around these impacts. Through the Youth Lead the Way project, a program that supports youth and science center collaboration was developed and implemented by integrating two well-established methods: Youth Advisory Boards and
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resource research Museum and Science Center Programs
This is a guide to supporting a Youth Advisory Research Board, abbreviated to “YARB.”  A YARB integrates two well-established methods of working with youth: Youth Advisory Boards and Youth Participatory Action Research. Youth Advisory Boards give young participants an opportunity to implement real, observable change at institutions such as informal science education centers. 
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TEAM MEMBERS: Oregon Museum of Science and Industry
resource research Museum and Science Center Programs
This guide outlines how to tackle potential gaps in communication, engagement, scheduling, and work styles, as well as provide different ways to incorporate youth input and voice into projects. This guide is divided into four sections: Youth vs. Adults, Youth Engagement, Communicating with Youth, and Advising.
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TEAM MEMBERS: OMSI YouthCARE team
resource evaluation Professional Development, Conferences, and Networks
The aim of this evaluation study was to assess the extent to which the three PD workshop sessions (one for non-education staff, one for education staff and one for program youth) supported knowledge and confidence of Sciencenter staff and youth participants around the topics of integrating feedback from, and co-creating content with youth. The evaluation team used qualitative approaches to collect data through pre- and post-PD workshop questionnaires as well as a post-interview with the program coordinator two weeks after the PD workshops.
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TEAM MEMBERS: Carla Herran Sierra Martinez