Millenials are the Most Science Curious Generation in the U.S.

Date: 
Friday, September 21, 2018
Resource Type:
Research Brief | Research Products
Environment Type: 
Media and Technology, Broadcast Media, Websites, Mobile Apps, and Online Media
Audience: 
Adults | Museum/ISE Professionals
Discipline: 
General STEM
Organization:
KQED, Jacobs Media Strategies, Texas Tech University, Yale Law School
Description: 

Due to the dynamic nature of many fields of science, most adults will acquire the majority of their science information after they leave formal schooling. Future public-policy decisions will require adults to have an understanding of the practice and nature of modern science and technology. A major source for continued learning is science media and journalism, which has the capacity to provoke and increase science curiosity and the value of science.

In partnership with Jacobs Media Strategies, the Cultural Cognition Project at Yale Law School and Texas Tech University, KQED, the NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, along with several public media partners conducted the first ever survey of Millennial science media habits, science curiosity and cultural beliefs. Millennials, born between 1981 and 1996, are projected to soon be the largest and most diverse adult generation in the U.S. and have radically changed media consumption habits.

Funder(s): 
NSF
Funding Program: 
AISL
Award Number: 
1811019
Funder(s): 
NSF
Funding Program: 
AISL
Award Number: 
1810990

Team Members

Fred JacobsFred JacobsAuthor
Jason HollinsJason HollinsAuthor
Dan KahanDan KahanAuthor

Request to Edit a Resource

If you would like to edit a resource, please use this form to submit your request.